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Research Article | Open Access
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  • SCL-90-R and Suicide Ideation in Torture and War Survivors Receiving Psychotherapy

    Valach, Ladislav 1      

    1Lindenstrasse 26,3047 Bremgarten, Switzerland.

    Abstract

    Objectives:

    Torture survivors suffer psychosocial distress such as posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and depression. Patients with PTSD and depression have increased risk for suicidal behavior. The aim of this study is to identify those torture and war survivors who have suicidal thoughts and describe their psychological profile as assessed in SCL-90-R. The patients of the Swiss Red Cross Centre for Torture Victims receiving psychotherapy were monitored with the SCL-90-R (N=58). Results: Out of 56 patients 32 (57%) declared that they did not suffer under the thought to end their own life (0=not at all), 10 (18%) indicated that they suffered substantially (scale value 3) or extremely (4) while 14 (25%) suffered somehow (1, 2). The endorsement of the suicide ideation correlates highly with all SCL-90-R scales, particularly with the scale Depression and PTSD indicating that the patients with suicide ideation also show considerable psychopathology. The scale Depression explained 40% of the variance of the suicide thoughts item and the scale Anger-hostility added another 5%.

    Conclusion:

    Suicide prevention should be an important part of the treatment and care in dealing with war and torture survivors.

    Received 18 Apr 2018; Accepted 11 Jun 2018; Published 29 Jun 2018;

    Academic Editor:Nóra Bunford, Hungarian Academy of Sciences

    Checked for plagiarism: Yes

    Review by: Single-blind

    Copyright©  2018 Valach Ladislav

    License
    Creative Commons License    This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.

    Competing interests

    The authors have declared that no competing interests exist.

    Citation:

    Valach, Ladislav (2018) SCL-90-R and Suicide Ideation in Torture and War Survivors Receiving Psychotherapy . Journal of Cognitive Behavioral Therapy - 1(1):11-24.
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    Introduction

    Torture survivors are known to suffer substantial sequelae and psychosocial distress 1, 2, 3. The well-documented diagnoses are posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and depression. It has further been reported that patients with PTSD and patients with depression have increased risk for suicidal behavior 4, 5, 6.

    In one of the studies dealing with suicidal behavior and PTSD comorbidity with depression Oquendo and colleagues 7 found that patients with PTSD and depression had higher risk for suicide. Consistent with the findings of Marshall and coworkers 8 the authors found that suicidal ideation was most severe in the depressed patients who had current PTSD and, therefore, more symptoms, suggesting that suicidal ideation lessens in major depressive episodes once PTSD subsides.

    Additionally, association between suicidal behavior and aggressivity has been reported in borderline personality disorder 9, 10 and major depression 11, 12. Higher levels of aggression, including autoaggression, have been reported in PTSD patients 13, 14, 15, 16.

    Further studies of the risk of suicidal behavior in patients with diagnoses of both PTSD and major depressive episode 17, 18, 19 suggest a synergistic effect on suicidal behavior.

    It is important to realize that one suicide attempt is not an end in itself but it often is followed by additional suicide attempts and sometimes by a completed suicide. Therefore, once attempting a suicide there is a high probability of repeating the attempt or committing a suicide. In The Netherlands at least 11% of patients treated in general hospitals following suicide attempts make repeat attempts within one year 20. In the UK, figures of 12-25% have been reported 21. At least 40% of all suicide attempters seen in general hospitals report previous suicide attempts 22. Also repetition of attempts is strongly associated with the risk of eventual suicide 23, 24, 25.

    As suicide thoughts and suicidality are urgent and life-threatening issues they should be attended to with high priority in the mental health treatment of the war and torture survivors. Thus, the aim of this study is to identify those torture and war survivors who have suicidal thoughts and indicate their psychological profile as assessed in SCL-90R, in particular the extent of PTSD and depression.

    Method

    Subjects

    The study participants consisted of the Swiss Red Cross Centre for Torture Victims patients (N=80) receiving psychotherapy. They were monitored with the SCL-90-R as a part of the assessment procedure performed by psychotherapists in an early phase of the therapy, though for various reasons it was not possible to obtain a filled check list from everyone, but from 58 patients. The center offers a wide range of outpatient therapies for victims of torture and also provides training for health personnel 26. The SCL-90-R was presented either in the native language of the patient or in a language the patient felt most comfortable. The patients were in their majority from Bosnia-Herzegovina or Kurds from Turkey (Table 1), two third were male and in average they were 37 years old. Two thirds of the patients had one or more children, lived with their families and often received post secondary education (Two thirds of the patients had one or more children, lived with their families and often received more than 8 years of schooling). As they were recognized refugees they spent on average 2-3 years in Switzerland before being referred to the Centre. There were no substantial differences between those patients who did fill in the SCL-90-R and those who did not except for a trend in gender (59% males in the groups of patients without the SCL-90-R vs. 91% males in the group with SCL-90-R) (Table 2).

    Table 1. Countries of origin of the war and torture victims
    n (58)
    Country of origin    
    Iran 2 3.4
    Iraq 2 3.4
    Swiss (abroad) 2 3.4
    Turkey 26 44.8
    Yugoslavia 7 12.1
    Bosnia 17 29.3
    missing 2 3.4

    Table 2. Characteristics of the patients included in the study (SCL-90-R administered) and those who were excluded from the study (no SCL-90-R)
      no SCL-90-R    SCL-90-R      
      (N=22)   (N=58)      
      mean std dev mean std dev t p
    Age 40 11.43 37.2 6.24 1.06 0.301
    Year of immigration  91.1  9.1  92.5  2.6  -0.69  0.497
      no SCL-90-R SCL-90-R        
      n % (N=22) n %(N=58)    
    Gender *            
    male 13 59.1 47 81    
    female 9 40.9 11 19    
    Marital status            
    single 5 22.7 13 22.4    
    married 12 54.5 38 65.5    
    widowed / divorced 5 22.7 7 12    
    Children            
    yes 13 59.1 39 69.6    
    Family in Switzerland            
    yes 15 58.2 46 79.3    
    Education(years of schooling)                  
    median 8    8      
    Further education(in years)                  
    median 4    3      
    Unemployed            
    yes 15 68.2 43 74.1    
    * Yates corrected Chi-square=3.01, df=1, p=0.08            
        no SCL-90-R   SCL-90-R    
        (N=22)     (N=58)  
      n % (N=22) n %(N=58)    
    referral            
    self 5 22.7 15 25.9    
    charity 6 27.3 30 51.7    
    practitioner 4 18.2 6 10.3    
    psychiatric            
    institution 4 18.2 3 5.2    
    looked after by charity institution            
    yes 11 50 45 77.6    

    Instruments

    The SCL-90-R is an established instrument for monitoring psychological distress of the patients, as well as of war and torture survivors 27, and provides scores on 9 primary symptom dimensions (somatization, obsessive-compulsive, interpersonal sensitivity, depression, anxiety, hostility, phobic anxiety, paranoid ideation, psychoticism) and on 3 global indices (global severity index, positive distress index, positive symptom total) 28, 29, 30 as well as on the 25 items scale of PTSD 31. The self-administered questionnaire consists of 90 items assessed on Likert like scale (0=not at all, 4=extremely). The item 15 asks for assessment of the statement 'How much were you disturbed in last 7 days by thoughts to end your life'. We assume that, while this statement might not differentiate between those who did not have any thought about ending their life and those who had this thought, but found it agreeable, it is a good indicator of suicide ideation in an important stage of suicide risk when it still is disturbing and could be attended to.

    Statistical Analysis

    The data were processed and the descriptive statistics and the regression analysis were performed using the PC version of the SPSS 10.0 software.

    Results

    Out of 56 patients 32 (57%) declared that they did not suffer under the thought to end their own life (0=not at all), 10 (18%) indicated that they suffered substantially (scale value 3) or extremely (4) while 14 (25%) suffered somehow (1, 2). Males and females did not differ in their endorsement of suicide ideation (12 males (medium (2), substantially (3), extremely (4)) and 3 females, both representing 27% of their group). Those torture survivors who suffered under thoughts to end their life were in average the same age as those who did not (mean 37.6 vs. 36.9 years (stddev 6.2 vs. 6.0)). Both groups immigrated to Switzerland in average in the same year (mean=1992, stddev=2.5 vs. 2.7).

    The endorsement of the suicide ideation item correlates highly with all SCL-90-R scales, particularly with the scale Depression and PTSD indicating that the patients with suicide ideation also show considerable psychopathology (Table 3). It also correlates substantially with the SCL-90-R items: 'Thought that something is wrong with my mind' (item 90), 'Thought on death and dying' (59), 'Desire to break things' (67), 'Fear of fainting' (82), 'Hopelessness' (54), 'Thought of being punished for sins' (85) (Table 4). To answer the question which SCL-90-R scale best predicts the suicide ideation in explaining the largest part of its variance the variable 'Thought to end my life' was entered in the stepwise multiple regression as a dependent variable and the SCL-90-R scales as independent variables. As expected the scale Depression explained a high proportion (40%) of the variance and the scale Anger-hostility added another 5% (Table 5). Entering the individual SCL-90-R items into the stepwise multiple regression as independent variables (‘Thought to end my life’ as dependent variable) we found that the item 'The thought that I should be punished for my sins' explained 56% of the variance of the suicide ideation item. The following 4 items added another 30% to the explanation of the variance of the dependent variable ('The inclination to get into explaining and arguing', 'Difficulties in falling asleep', 'Lack of appetite' and 'Fear when leaving home alone') (Table 6).

    Table 3. Correlation of 'Thoughts to end my life' (SCL-90-R15) with SCL-90-R scales
    Scales SCL15: Thoughts to end my life
    r
    Somatizing .344**
    Obsessive-compulsive .508**
    Interpersonal  
    sensitive .505**
    Depression .644**
    Anxiety .573**
    Anger-hostility .598**
    Phobic anxiety .579**
    Paranoid ideation .480**
    Psychoticism .590**
    PTSD .637**

    ** p < .01 (2-tailed)
    Table 4. Correlation of 'Thoughts to end my life' (SCL15) with SCL-90-R items (r>0.40)
    SCL-90-R items r
    (13) Fear of open places .535
    (14) Lack of energy, slow .488
    (16) Hearing voices .473
    (17) Shaking .503
    (18) I cannot trust others .421
    (23) Startled without reason .438
    (24) Eruption of feelings .477
    (25) Fear of leaving home .423
    (33) Fearful .522
    (43) Others observing you .495
    (51) Emptiness .429
    (54) Hopelessness .584
    (55) Concentration difficulties .419
    (61) Not feeling well when observed .513
    (62) Having someone else's thoughts .444  
    (67) Desire to break things .629
    (69) Feeling embarrassed when with others .475
    (70) Avoiding masses .489
    (72) Startle and panic fits .548
    (79) Feeling worthless .544
    (81) Desire to scream and throw things .451
    (82) Fear of fainting .588
    (85) Thought of being punished for sins .554
    (86) Startling thoughts .435
    (90) Thought that something iswrong with your mind .635

    all p<0.01 (two tailed)

     

    Table 5. Stepwise multiple regression; dependent variable: 'Thoughts to end my life' (SCL-90-R15), independent variables: SCL-90-R scales
    SCL-90-R scales  Multiple R Adjusted R square Beta p
    1 Depression  0.644  0.404  0.443  0.001
    2 Anger-hostility  0.688  0.454  0.315  0.018

    Table 6. Stepwise multiple regression; dependent variable: 'Thoughts to end my life' (SCL-90-R15), independent variables: SCL-90-R items
    SCL-90-R Items: Multiple R    Adjusted R square Beta p
    (85) The thoughts that I should be punished for my sins  0.760  0.559 0.761 0.0000
    (74) The inclination to get into explaining and arguing 0.867 0.727 0.401 0.0001
    (44) Difficulties in falling asleep  0.909 0.801 0.311 0.0149
    (19) Lack of appetite  0.930 0.837 0.210 0.0149
    (25) Fear when leaving home alone  0.947 0.869 -0.250 0.0298

    The item 'I should be punished for my sins' is best explained by 'Thought to end my life' (explaining 56% of the variance), 'Fearfulness' (additional 10%) and 'The inclination to get into explaining and arguing', 'Nervousness', and 'Fear when leaving home alone' explaining another 25% of the variance (Table 7).

    Table 7. Stepwise multiple regression; dependent variable 'Thought I should be punished for my sins' (SCL85), independent variables SCL-90-R items
      Multiple R Adjusted R square Beta p
    (15) Thought to end my life  0.760  0.559  0.813  0.0000
    (33) Fearful  0.832  0.663  0.349  0.0005
    (74) The inclination to get into explaining and arguing  0.884  0.748    -0.469   .0000  
    (02) Nervousness  0.925  0.824  -0.384  0.0001
    (25) Fear when leaving home alone  0.963  0.908  0.351  0.0004

    The item 'Inclination to get into explaining and arguing' (74) is best predicted by 'Desire to break things' (64) and 'I have to worry a lot' (31) explaining together 57% of the variance of the dependent variable (Table 8). The dependent variable 'Difficulties falling asleep' (44) is best accounted for by 'Nervousness' (02) (explaining 47%) and by 'Stomach troubles' (40), 'Feeling uncomfortable when with others' (69), 'Desire to overeat' (60), ' Depression' (30), 'Self blame' (26), 'Memory difficulties' (9) and 'Emptiness' (51), all adding another 48% to the explanation of the variance of the dependent variable (Table 9).

    Table 8. Stepwise multiple regression; dependent variable 'Inclination to get into explaining and arguing' (SCL74), independent variables SCL-90-R items
      Multiple R    Adjusted R square Beta p
    (67) Desire to break things  0.706  0.476  0.633  0.0002
    (31) I have to worry a lot  0.780  0.571  0.338  0.0247

    Table 9. Stepwise multiple regression; dependent variable 'Difficulties falling asleep' (SCL44), independent variables SCL-90-R items
      Multiple R    Adjusted R square Beta p
    (02) Nervousness  0.702  0.469  0.669  0.0000
    (40) Stomach troubles  0.773  0.559  -0.592  0.0000
    (69)Feeling uncomfortable when with others 0.871  0.722  0.351   0.0001
    (60) Desire to overeat  0.920  0.815  0.181  0.0055
    (30) Depression  0.946  0.866  0.213  0.0015
    (26) Self blame  0.968  0.915  -0.243  0.0004
    (09) Memory difficulties  0.977  0.935  0.152  0.0105
    (51) Emptiness  0.984  0.950  0.160  0.0282

    The variable 'Lack of appetite' relevant for the suicide ideation is best explained by 'Back pain' (27) (35%) and 'Feeling I should worry a lot' (31) (explaining additional 20%). The items 'Hot and cold waves', 'Fear of being caught', 'Headache', 'Compulsive repetition of actions', 'Others know my thoughts', 'Angry and irritated', 'Shaking', 'Decreased interest in sex' and 'Difficulties in breathing' account for additional 43% of the variance of the dependent variable 'Lack of appetite' (Table 10). Finally, computing the stepwise multiple regression with the dependent variable 'Fear to leave home alone' which accounts for a significant amount of the variance of suicide ideation, and the SCL-90-R items as independent variables we found that the item 'Sudden startle without reason' (23) explains 44% of the variance of the dependent variable. The item 'Avoiding places and activities because startle' explains additional 17% of the variance of the dependent variable. The three items 'Difficulties in concentration', 'Difficulties in falling asleep' and 'Compulsive repetition of action' account for additional 20% of the variance of the item 'Fear to leave home alone' which has been found relevant for suicide ideation (Table 11).

    Table 10. Stepwise multiple regression; dependent variable 'Lack of appetite' (SCL19), independent variables SCL-90-R items
      Multiple R    Adjusted R square Beta p
    (27) Back pain  0.648  0.345  -0.751  0.0000
    (31) Feeling I should worry a lot  0.783  0.554  0.473  0.0000
    (49) Hot and cold waves  0.843  0.649  0.552  0.0000
    (22) Fear of being caught  0.896  0.749  -0.631  0.0000
    (01) Headache  0.929  0.814  0.346  0.0000
    (65) Compulsive repetition of acts  0.952  0.866  0.507  0.0000
    (35) Others know my thoughts  0.970  0.909  0.316  0.0000
    (11) Easily angry and irritated  0.978  0.927  -0.493  0.0000
    (17) Shaking  0.986 0.950    0.423  0.0000
    (05) Decreased interest in sex  0.992  0.971  0.141  0.0029
    (48) Difficulties in breathing  0.995  0.981  0.252  0.0001

    Table 11. Stepwise multiple regression; dependent variable 'Fear to leave home alone' (SCL25), independent variables SCL-90-R items
    Multiple R    Adjusted R square Beta p
    (23) Sudden startle without reason  0.683  0.442 0.904   0.0000
    (50) Avoiding places/activities  0.801  0.607  0.655  0.0000
    (55) Difficulties in concentration  0.851 0.684 0.617  0.0002
    (44) Difficulties in falling asleep  0.891  0.751  0.336  0.0114
    (65) Compulsive repetition of action  0.923  0.811  -0.320  0.0168

    Table 12. Stepwise multiple regression; dependent variable: suicide ideation, independent variables: items of each of the SCL-90-R scale
      Multiple R Adjusted R square Beta p
    Somatization        
    1 SCL12 Heart and chest pain  0.362  0.115  0.362  0.0060
    Obsessive-compulsive        
    1 SCL51 Emptiness in head  0.465  0.200  0.397  0.0037
    2 SCL65 Compulsive repetition  0.537  0.256  0.276  0.0392
    Interpersonal sensitivity        
    1 SCL61 Feeling uneasy when observed  0.492  0.227  0.049  0.0002
    Depression        
    1 SCL54 Hopelessness  0.568  0.309  0.496  0.0008
    2 SCL29 Loneliness  0.629  0.371  -0.360  0.0039
    3 SCL79 I am worthless  0.693  0.448  0.379  0.0074
    Anxiety        
    1 SCL72 Startle and panic fits  0.553  0.293  0.374  0.0077
    2 SCL17 Shaking  0.608  0.345  0.309  0.0261
    Hostility        
    1 SCL67 Desire to break things  0.629  0.383  0.522  0.0000
    2 SCL24 Eruption of feelings  0.670  0.428  0.257  0.0290
    Phobic anxiety        
    1 SCL82 Fear of fainting  0.588  0.333  0.447  0.0002
    2 SCL13 Fear of open places  0.675  0.435  0.361  0.0019
    Paranoid ideation        
    1 SCL43 Others are observing me  0.471  0.207  0.471  0.0003
    Psychoticism        
    1 SCL85 Thoughts of being punished for my sins  0.648   0.400   0.571   0.0020 
    2 SCL87 Something is seriously wrong with my body 0.731 0.501 0.348 0.0156
    PTSD        
    1 SCL59 Thoughts about death and dying  0.753  0.549  0.485  0.0032
    2 SCL90 Something is wrong with my mind  0.824   0.652   0.428   0.0080 

    Analyzing how much the individual items of each scale account for the variance of the item 'Thoughts to end my life' we computed a series of stepwise multiple regressions entering suicide ideation as dependent and the items of each scale as independent variables.

    In the scale Somatization the item 'Heart and chest pain' explained the highest amount of variance of the item 'Thoughts to end my life'. The item 'Emptiness in my head' accounted for the largest part of the dependent variable explained by the items of the scale Obsessive-compulsive. Among the items of the scale Interpersonal sensitivity the item 'Feeling uneasy when observed' explained about 23% of the variance. Out of the three items of the scale Depression significantly accounting for the variance of the dependent variable the item 'Hopelessness' was the most important one.

    The best explanation within the scale Anxiety provided the item 'Startle and panic fits'. The item 'Desire to break things' contributed most to the explained variance by the items of the scale 'Hostility'. The scale Phobic anxiety was best represented by the item 'Fear of fainting', while the item 'Others are observing me' had the best predictive power among the items of the scale Paranoid ideation.

    The item 'Thoughts of being punished' explained the most variance when the items of the scale Psychoticism were entered and the item 'Thoughts about death and dying' explained the highest portion of variance of the suicidal ideation when the PTSD items were the independent variables in the stepwise multiple regression.

    Discussion

    With 43% of our patients indicating having or suffering under suicidal thoughts the group is comparable to those people with three or four PTSD symptoms monitored by Marshall and colleagues 8.

    The authors defined sub-threshold PTSD as one, two or three PTSD symptoms. They found that in the group with one PTSD symptom 13% of the people had suicidal thoughts, while with 4 PTSD symptoms 33% were found having suicidal thoughts.

    One of the variables explaining the suicide ideation was 'Difficulties in getting asleep'. It has been indicated that sleep complaints are prevalent in suicidal patients 32, 33, 34, 35, 36 in whom insomnia is a known risk factor that may be present within the year before a completed suicide 37, as a long term behavioral characteristic in male suicides 38, and in severe suicidal attempters in a managed care population 39. Considering the often described understanding of psychological problems by this group of patients treating sleep difficulties could be a good point of entry for a psychotherapy with some suicide preventive consequences.

    Conclusion

    This is a cross-sectional study of a clinical sample with all the known limits and caveats for generalizing any results. Nevertheless, we could indicate that suicide behavior presents a serious problem next to the expected PTSD-symptoms. Consequently, a substantial amount of the described patients are at high risk for suicide, thus making the psychotherapy urgent. However, the suicide issue should be addressed in a specific treatment, than despite of the high correlation with depression and PTSD suicide prevention requires a specific intervention 40. There are only a few studies indicating some success in the psychotherapy treatment of the war and torture survivors 41, 42. Yet, suicide and suicide attempts in war and torture survivors still remain unpredictable then there is lack of evidence-based suicide prevention interventions for this group of people.

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