Postsynaptic Potentials

Postsynaptic potentials (PSPs) are electrical signals in neurons that occur after the release of neurotransmitters from the presynaptic neuron. In the nervous system, PSPs play an essential role in information processing and signal transmission between neurons. PSPs are classified into two main categories based on their polarities: excitatory postsynaptic potentials (EPSPs) and inhibitory postsynaptic potentials (IPSPs). EPSPs are depolarizations of the postsynaptic membrane, which increase the chances of firing an action potential. On the other hand, IPSPs are hyperpolarizations of the postsynaptic membrane that decrease the chances of firing an action potential. The balance between EPSPs and IPSPs is crucial for controlling neuronal activity and maintaining proper brain function. Imbalances in these signals can lead to neurological disorders such as epilepsy, anxiety, and depression. Neurological research has proven that certain therapies can modify PSPs, improving brain functionality. For instance, Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (TMS) is a non-invasive technique that uses magnetic fields to stimulate nerve cells in the brain. TMS has been shown to increase EPSPs, causing more action potentials to fire and thus enhancing neural activity. In summary, PSPs play a significant role in communication between neurons in the nervous system. Proper functioning of these electrical signals is crucial for maintaining neuronal activity and is essential for overall brain function. Modifying PSPs through therapies such as TMS can improve brain functionality and treat neurological disorders.


From: Neurobiology

Related Article For "Postsynaptic Potentials"

About (2) results

Article:

The Potentials of Antioxidant Micronutrients in the Management of Metabolic Syndrome

Journal:

Antioxidant Activity

Article:

Biolarvicidal Potentials of the Methanolic-Leaf-Extracts of Selected Tropical Plant Species

Journal:

Experimental and Clinical Toxicology