Parkinson's Disease

Parkinson's disease is a neurodegenerative disorder that affects movement in the body. It is caused by the loss of dopamine-producing cells in the brain. Dopamine is a chemical messenger that helps control movement and emotional responses. As dopamine-producing cells die, the dopamine levels in the brain decrease, causing the characteristic symptoms of Parkinson's disease, such as tremors, stiffness, and slow mobility. Neurological research and therapy for Parkinson's disease aims to slow or stop the progression of the disease and improve the quality of life for people living with the condition. One common therapy is medication that can increase dopamine levels in the brain. These medications can reduce the symptoms of Parkinson's disease but do not cure it. Other therapies include physical therapy, which can help people with Parkinson's disease maintain mobility and independence, and occupational therapy, which focuses on helping people with Parkinson's disease maintain their ability to perform daily tasks. Speech therapy can also help people with Parkinson's disease improve their ability to communicate and swallow. Research is ongoing to develop new therapies for Parkinson's disease, such as deep brain stimulation, which involves placing electrodes in the brain to stimulate specific areas and control symptoms. Overall, neurological research and therapy for Parkinson's disease is critical for managing the symptoms and improving the quality of life for people living with the condition. With continued research and advancements in therapy, there is hope for a cure or better management of this disease.


From: Neurobiology

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Editor-in-chief: Zheng Jiang, Department of Neuroscience, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine.
Publication Type: Open Access Journal
Description: The brain, spinal cord, and nerves make up the nervous system. Together they control all the workings of the body. When something goes wrong with a part of your nervous system, you can have trouble moving, speaking, swallowing, breathing, or learning. You can also have problems with your memory, senses, or mood.