Evoked Potentials

Evoked potentials (EPs) are neural responses recorded from the brain in response to sensory stimuli such as sound, light, or touch. These responses indicate how the nervous system processes information and can be used to diagnose and monitor a range of neurological conditions. EPs are used extensively in research and clinical practice to assess sensory, motor, and cognitive functions, and for monitoring neurological responses during surgery. They are particularly useful in differentiating between normal and abnormal brain activity in patients with conditions such as multiple sclerosis, epilepsy, and brain tumors. The most common types of EPs include auditory, visual, and somatosensory evoked potentials. Auditory EPs are recorded from electrodes placed on the scalp in response to sound stimuli. Visual EPs are recorded from electrodes placed on the scalp in response to visual stimuli, and somatosensory EPs are recorded from electrodes placed on the skin in response to touch stimuli. EPs can also be used for therapy. For example, Brain-Computer Interfaces use EPs to allow people with severe paralysis to control external devices such as a computer mouse or a robotic arm. Neurofeedback therapy uses EPs as feedback to teach patients to regulate their own brain activity and improve conditions like ADHD, anxiety or depression. In conclusion, evoked potentials play an important role both in neuroscience research and in clinical practice. The ability to assess and monitor neurological functions through EPs provides valuable insights into the human brain and can help to identify and treat neurological conditions.


From: Neurobiology

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