Defense Proteins

Defense Proteins are a type of protein found in cells that are involved in protecting organisms from bacterial, viral, and parasitic infections. They work by binding to specific pathogenic molecules and blocking them from entering the host cell. Defense Proteins are a vital component of an organism’s innate immune system and play a key role in preventing and controlling disease. As such, they have become an important research target in recent years, with the aim of discovering new ways to prevent and treat a range of infectious diseases. In addition, Defense Proteins are increasingly being used in medical applications such as diagnostics and therapeutics.


From: International Journal of Anesthesia

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