Antigenic Variation

Antigenic variation is an important process in certain pathogens that enables them to escape their host's immune responses. Through this process, pathogens can change the surface molecules of their cells, called antigens, which allow them to effectively evade the host’s immune system. This allows the pathogen to survive and spread for longer periods of time, which can result in more serious or chronic infections. Understanding antigenic variation is critical to developing successful treatments and prevention strategies for infectious diseases. Additionally, it can also provide insights into the evolution of pathogens and the immune system.


From: International Journal of Anesthesia

Related Article For "Antigenic Variation"

About (8) results

Article:

Perception Threshold Variations of Pain Area with Herpetic Ophthalmic Neuralgia

Journal:

Ophthalmic Science

Article:

Variation in Haemoglobin Reference Ranges and Implications for Use of Health Service Resource in the Republic of Ireland and the UK

Journal:

Hematology and Oncology Research

Article:

Age Variation in Bitter Taste Perception in Relation to the Tas2r38 Taste Receptor Phenotype

Journal:

International Journal of Nutrition

Article:

Induction of Antioxidant Capacity and Hydroxymethylfurfural Content Variations by Modifications of Cooked Fruit Processing.

Journal:

Antioxidant Activity

Article:

Rice Epigenetic Pathways: Great Genetic Variation and Implication for Rapid Rice Breeding

Journal:

Plant Genetics and Crop Research

Article:

Diurnal Variation in the Core Interthreshold Zone in Women and its Sex Difference

Journal:

International Physiology Journal

Article:

Variation of Ethnomycological Knowledge in a Community from Central Mexico

Journal:

Fungal Diversity

Article:

Variations in Diameter of the Left Coronary Artery and its Main Branches among Adult Population of Khartoum State, Sudan

Journal:

Hypertension and Cardiology