Conjugated Proteins

Conjugated proteins are proteins that have been modified to contain a non-protein component. Examples of modified proteins include glycoproteins, lipoproteins and phosphoproteins. These proteins are important in numerous physiological functions, including cell recognition, signal transduction, programmed cell death and maintaining the structural integrity of the cell. In addition, conjugated proteins are often used as targets for drug development and diagnostics. The conjugation of proteins with various non-protein components has become an increasingly important tool in biotechnology and drug development.


From: International Journal of Amino Acids

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