Name: Jian Zhang

Qualification: Ph.D

Country: USA

Affiliation:

Biochemistry and Molecular Biology,
University of Maryland School of Medicine at Baltimore.

Phone no: (410) 706-7500

Fax: (410) 706-8408

Email: Send an Email


Address:

Center for Fluorescence Spectroscopy (CFS)
University of Maryland School of Medicine at Baltimore
Bio Park 1, N270

Research Interests:

  • My research interest is on developing fluorescence metal nanoprobes as a new class of nanoparticle probes for fluorescence cell imaging. 
  • Optical properties of fluorescent metal nanoparticles are greatly improved by near-field interactions between organic dyes and plasmon resonances from metal nanoparticles. 
  • The developed fluorescent metal nanoprobes are used to detect target receptors on cell surfaces or genomic targets within cells by fluorescence intensity or lifetime cell imaging on time-resolved confocal microscopy. 
  • So far, these novel nanoparticle probes are used for determining HIV- or tumor-associated targets on cells or tissues.

Biography:

  • Dr. Jian Zhang received his Ph.D. degree from University of Ibaraki of Japan in 1999. 
  • After completing his postdoctoral training in North Carolina State University with Dr. M. A. Fox and University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill with Dr. R. W. Murray.
  • I currently work as an assistant professor in The Center for Fluorescence Spectrascopy (CFS), University of Maryland School of Medicine (UMSOM).
  • He has authored over 70 peer-review scientific papers. 
  • My research interest is on developing fluorescence metal nanoprobes as a new class of nanoparticle probes for fluorescence cell imaging. 
  • Optical properties of fluorescent metal nanoparticles are greatly improved by near-field interactions between organic dyes and plasmon resonances from metal nanoparticles. 
  • The developed fluorescent metal nanoprobes are used to detect target receptors on cell surfaces or genomic targets within cells by fluorescence intensity or lifetime cell imaging on time-resolved confocal microscopy. 
  • So far, these novel nanoparticle probes are used for determining HIV- or tumor-associated targets on cells or tissues.

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