Name: Jean-Pierre Louboutin

Country: United States

Affiliation:

University of the West Indies,
Mona Campus, Kingston,
Jamaica,
Gene Therapy Program,
University of Pennsylvania.

Email: Send an Email


Address:

Jamaica and Philadelphia,
PA, USA.

Research Interests:

Stem cells; bone marrow; gene therapy; neurology; HIV-1; HTLV-1; retroviruses; neurosciences

Biography:

  • Dr Louboutin, MD, PhD, is a Neurologist interested in gene therapy/cell therapy as well as in neurovirology.
  • He recently focused his work on the role of oxidative stress in the neuropathogenesis of HIV-1.
  • By developing different animal models of HIV-1 Associated Neurocognitive Disorder (HAND), he studied the deleterious effects of HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein gp120 and non-structural protein Tat in the brain (apoptosis, oxidative stress, neuroinflammation, abnormalities of the blood-brain barrier, upregulation of MMPs).
  • Gene delivery of antioxidant enzymes SOD1 and GPx1 in different situations (intracerebral, intrathecal, intravenous), and assessed in different experimental settings, protected neurons against gp120- and Tat-induced apoptosis and other harmful effects.
  • Gene delivery to the spinal cord, either intravenously or intrathecally, resulted in long-term transgene expression in neurons of the spinal cord.
  • Another field of interest are the neurological manifestations linked to HTLV-1 and their pathogenesis.
  • Dr Louboutin is currently in Jamaica trying to get a better understanding of the physiopathology of tropical spastic paraparesis/HTLV-1-associated myelopathy (TSP/HAM).
  • The current collaboration with the Gene Therapy Program of the University of Pennsylvania is focused on gene therapy approach in different neurodegenerative disorders, (more particularly in lysosomal diseases, i.e., mucopolysaccharidosis, MPS).  
  • Finally, Dr Louboutin is involved in cell therapy using stem cells in different tissues (i.e., bone marrow stem cells, skeletal muscle, Central Nervous System).
  • This approach emphasizes the interaction with regenerative medicine in a translational context. Intramarrow gene delivery of SV40-derived vectors downregulating CCR5 resulted in the reduction of excitotoxin-induced seizures and their harmful consequences.
  • These results emphasize the role of CCR5 in the immune-mediated process underlying some forms of epilepsy.
  • He is the author of more than 80 papers in peer-reviewed journals and more than 10 book chapters.

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